2003 Churchill LBV (unfiltered)

Tasting notes for individual Ports, with an index sorted by vintage and alphabetically.
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Tasting notes for individual Ports, with an index sorted by vintage and alphabetically.
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AW77
Morgan 1991
Posts: 1112
Joined: 20:20 Wed 25 Sep 2013
Location: Cologne, Germany

2003 Churchill LBV (unfiltered)

Post by AW77 » 15:44 Sat 26 Oct 2013

A lot of sediment, D 0h: smells of red currant, a little bit of raspberry and pepper, a lovely nose D +3h: crimson colour, does not smell fruity any more, smells more ethereous: menthol or eucalyptus, the nose somehow reminds me of young ports by Taylor's, the taste is a bit like jam, but it's not that sweet (Churchill's generally is more on the dry side), mid-length finish,
I didn't like the "jamy" character, which I found a little bit dull. Perhaps this "jamyness" is due to the fact that 2003 had such a hot summer (?). The etherous nose also was not after my fancy , as I prefer fruit (the more fruit, the better). So: 84 P.
To be fair, I must admit that the person I shared the bottle with was much more pleased by the wine than I was. He would have written a much more favourable tasting note. Wine after all is a very personal thing.
There's a local proverb here in the Rhineland: "One man's owl is another man's nightingale."
The Eleventh Commandment: Thou shalt know thy Port

LGTrotter
Dalva Golden White Colheita 1952
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Re: 2003 Churchill LBV (unfiltered)

Post by LGTrotter » 19:04 Sat 26 Oct 2013

AW77 wrote:"One man's owl is another man's nightingale."
I'm having that for my personal lexicon; fantastic.

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djewesbury
Graham’s 1970
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Re: 2003 Churchill LBV (unfiltered)

Post by djewesbury » 19:19 Sat 26 Oct 2013

LGTrotter wrote:
AW77 wrote:"One man's owl is another man's nightingale."
I'm having that for my personal lexicon; fantastic.
I want you to slip that into a question about JDAW's current quiz...
Daniel J.
delete.. delete.. *sigh*.. delete...

LGTrotter
Dalva Golden White Colheita 1952
Posts: 3673
Joined: 17:45 Fri 19 Oct 2012
Location: Somerset, UK

Re: 2003 Churchill LBV (unfiltered)

Post by LGTrotter » 19:22 Sat 26 Oct 2013

Busy, really busy.

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djewesbury
Graham’s 1970
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Re: 2003 Churchill LBV (unfiltered)

Post by djewesbury » 19:27 Sat 26 Oct 2013

LGTrotter wrote:Busy, really busy.
Copout.
Daniel J.
delete.. delete.. *sigh*.. delete...

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AW77
Morgan 1991
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Re: 2003 Churchill LBV (unfiltered)

Post by AW77 » 23:29 Wed 30 Oct 2013

Since LGTrotter wanted to know the original version, (http://www.theportforum.com/viewtopic.p ... 709#p63709) here it is:

"Dem einen sin Uhl, ist dem andern sin Nachtigall."

(It's in the local dialect, for the standard German version you would have to substitute "sin" with "seine" , "Uhl" with "Eule" and "andern" with "anderen")

The English equivalent could be: One man's meat is another man's poison.
The Eleventh Commandment: Thou shalt know thy Port

LGTrotter
Dalva Golden White Colheita 1952
Posts: 3673
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Location: Somerset, UK

Re: 2003 Churchill LBV (unfiltered)

Post by LGTrotter » 23:37 Wed 30 Oct 2013

So much better in the original translation and the original language. Thanks Andre.

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RAYC
Taylor Quinta de Vargellas 1987
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Re: 2003 Churchill LBV (unfiltered)

Post by RAYC » 00:38 Thu 31 Oct 2013

AW77 wrote:
The English equivalent could be: One man's meat is another man's poison.
The use of birds as allegorical opposites (and - not least because of this - the Owl/Nightingale contrast in particular) is certainly not alien to English literature.
Rob C.

LGTrotter
Dalva Golden White Colheita 1952
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Joined: 17:45 Fri 19 Oct 2012
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Re: 2003 Churchill LBV (unfiltered)

Post by LGTrotter » 01:03 Thu 31 Oct 2013

I like this; given the date of the story it is possible at the very least that the root is germanic anyway, as much of our folklore is.

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