Manuel Vasques Osorio 1870

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suqata
Cruz Ruby
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Joined: 11:19 Wed 14 Jul 2021

Manuel Vasques Osorio 1870

Post by suqata » 14:15 Wed 14 Jul 2021

Recently some wine, port and liqueurs had been handed to me by my groundmother and I have a bottle that I don't know whether is old wine or port. My doubt was due the fact that my groundfather was really methodotical and this one was sitting next to other 2 ports.
Can you please advice on how I can identify it?
The bottle is too dark for me to accurately identify a tawny/ruby thickness.

Appreciated!

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PhilW
Quinta do Vesuvio 1994
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Re: Manuel Vasques Osorio 1870

Post by PhilW » 15:32 Wed 14 Jul 2021

Hi and welcome to TPF; a very interesting bottle you have acquired. It's tricky to tell accurately from the photos, but I suspect this was bottled early in the 20th century, and with the VV marking I would guess this to be an 1870 colheita, perhaps bottled at around 60yrs old; however that is very much a guess.

There appear to have been, and still are a number of people with the name Vasques Osório around Regua, so there might well be someone who can help with this, but the trick would be to find them of course.

Of particular note is perhaps José Vasques Osório whose house appears to have been converted into an asylum which subsequently partly burned down in 1910, and was then rebuilt as a children's refuge/home (Casa do Asilo José Vasques Osório). This house is located on a street now also named Rua José Vasques Osório in commemoration.

It might be worth an enquiry to the Douro Museum (Museu do Douro) in Regua which is based less 100 yards away from this house; they may have detailed knowledge about the wine and port production in Regua in the 1870s, and/or may know local family members to ask.

If you do find out more, please let us know as it would be interesting to hear.

Andy Velebil
Dow 1980
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Re: Manuel Vasques Osorio 1870

Post by Andy Velebil » 17:21 Wed 14 Jul 2021

I agree it is most likely an old tawny bottled quite a long time ago. Most likely for private family use. As for value, that's very hard because it is not a well known producer and storage conditions all these years isn't known either. Or how good it actually is. just because it's old doesn't automatically make it great. Someone may take a flyer and pay 125-150 Euros for it.

The other two are bottled around the mid 1990's. That's a long time in bottle for those two producers so don't expect what current prices are for a "fresh" bottling of it.

If you are looking to sell, where are you located?

suqata
Cruz Ruby
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Joined: 11:19 Wed 14 Jul 2021

Re: Manuel Vasques Osorio 1870

Post by suqata » 17:59 Wed 14 Jul 2021

Thanks a lot of your answers! Even though i'm Portuguese and born quite close to Regua I'm now based too many countries away and it's not that easy to drop by the family's house :)

I'm not looking for selling, was only trying to understand if the wine was a Port or an old bottled wine. Regarding the other 2 I'll just drink them, not expecting any evaluation, appreciated.

Andy Velebil
Dow 1980
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Re: Manuel Vasques Osorio 1870

Post by Andy Velebil » 23:53 Wed 14 Jul 2021

suqata wrote:Thanks a lot of your answers! Even though i'm Portuguese and born quite close to Regua I'm now based too many countries away and it's not that easy to drop by the family's house :)

I'm not looking for selling, was only trying to understand if the wine was a Port or an old bottled wine. Regarding the other 2 I'll just drink them, not expecting any evaluation, appreciated.
When you taste them please let us know how you like them.

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JacobH
Dow 1980
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Re: Manuel Vasques Osorio 1870

Post by JacobH » 09:06 Thu 15 Jul 2021

Hi! Welcome to :tpf:!
suqata wrote:
17:59 Wed 14 Jul 2021
I'm not looking for selling, was only trying to understand if the wine was a Port or an old bottled wine. Regarding the other 2 I'll just drink them, not expecting any evaluation, appreciated.
Perhaps we should move this thread to Port Conversations if, happily, the original poster is planing on drinking them himself?
Andy Velebil wrote:
17:21 Wed 14 Jul 2021
I agree it is most likely an old tawny bottled quite a long time ago. Most likely for private family use.
If it was bottled for family use in the early 20th Century, would they really have gone to the trouble of having labels made up for the purpose? I would have thought you’d need to be bottling quite a lot for it to be worthwhile, and distributing it widely (otherwise just having the bin labelled would probably do.)
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PhilW
Quinta do Vesuvio 1994
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Re: Manuel Vasques Osorio 1870

Post by PhilW » 09:13 Thu 15 Jul 2021

JacobH wrote:
09:06 Thu 15 Jul 2021
If it was bottled for family use in the early 20th Century, would they really have gone to the trouble of having labels made up for the purpose? I would have thought you’d need to be bottling quite a lot for it to be worthwhile, and distributing it widely (otherwise just having the bin labelled would probably do.)
I can think of other bottlings where this has been done; the labels might also be applied later, e.g. when giving a bottle/case as a gift.

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DRT
Fonseca 1966
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Re: Manuel Vasques Osorio 1870

Post by DRT » 22:00 Mon 26 Jul 2021

PhilW wrote:
09:13 Thu 15 Jul 2021
JacobH wrote:
09:06 Thu 15 Jul 2021
If it was bottled for family use in the early 20th Century, would they really have gone to the trouble of having labels made up for the purpose? I would have thought you’d need to be bottling quite a lot for it to be worthwhile, and distributing it widely (otherwise just having the bin labelled would probably do.)
I can think of other bottlings where this has been done; the labels might also be applied later, e.g. when giving a bottle/case as a gift.
I have seen this done quite a few times when a member of a Douro family brings along a bottle of Grandfather's special old Port to a lunch or dinner. Not unusual at all.
"The first duty of Port is to be red"
Ernest H. Cockburn

Glenn E.
Dalva Golden White Colheita 1952
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Re: Manuel Vasques Osorio 1870

Post by Glenn E. » 23:33 Mon 26 Jul 2021

JacobH wrote:
09:06 Thu 15 Jul 2021
If it was bottled for family use in the early 20th Century, would they really have gone to the trouble of having labels made up for the purpose? I would have thought you’d need to be bottling quite a lot for it to be worthwhile, and distributing it widely (otherwise just having the bin labelled would probably do.)
Practically every bottle that I get from Brunheda has a hand-printed and hand-applied label. The techniques are more modern these days (ink jet printers, or even color laser printers) but the concept is the same.
Glenn Elliott

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