DOC-bagging

Anything but Port, this includes all wines other than fortified wines (which have their own section) even if they call themselves Port. There is a search facility for this part of the forum.
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Anything but Port, this includes all non-Port fortified wines even if they call themselves Port. There is a search facility for this part of the forum.
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JacobH
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Re: DOC-bagging

Post by JacobH »

Of the DOCs, the ones which I haven’t drunk or don’t currently own are: the four Algarve DOCs (Lagos, Portimão, Lagoa and Tavira); two from the Azores (Graciosa and Biscoitos); Lafões; Dotejo; and then a few from the Lisbon region: Encostas D’Aire; Alenquer; Arruda; and Torres Vedras. I think that’s 12 DOCS + Lourinhã. I can’t quite work out whether Lourinhã is exclusively brandy or just predominantly so.

Apart from Dotejo, most of these look pretty awkward to get in the UK, even importing them from Portugal. A few, like Encostas D’Aire are discussed much more than they are sold! I can’t actually see anyone advertising any Torres Vedras online for sale.

I think some of the VRs are also going to be a bit tricky, especially from regions where almost everything goes into a DOC. For example, I can’t remember ever seeing Duriense which I think is the VR for the Douro. But I am slightly less bothered about that!

I’ve also just bought my first non-classified Portuguese wine, a Buçaco tinto. The fact it doesn’t have a classification probably makes it even more unusual than many that do!
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MigSU
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Re: DOC-bagging

Post by MigSU »

I had a Duriense last week, and a might good wine it is: Quinta da Pedra Escrita Reserva (white).
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JacobH
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Re: DOC-bagging

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Tonight, we opened a 2018 Mira Arinto Bucelas, a DOC Bucelas. I know nothing about this region or its wines. It is located immediately North or Lisbon and looks to me like it is in serious danger of being swallowed up by urban sprawl! Arinto is, apparently, the traditional grape here. The internet tells me it produces wines with high acidity and lemon, but I think Mira have given it some quite sophisticated treatment. It’s very, very pale, with very little on the nose. But, in the mouth, the acidity is bright but not overpowering and the is a good freshness with limited fruit and only a touch of sweetness. As I have said before, I don’t really do white wines, but these seems pleasant enough and I think it is about as close to an archetypical Bucelas as one might find.
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JacobH
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Re: DOC-bagging

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Looking for a more serious red, we head North to the DOC Trás-os-Montes and the 2007 Quinta do Sobreiró de Cima “Vinha de Rio Torto”. This is apparently a blend of Touriga Nacional (50%), Alicante Bouschet (35%) and Trincadeira (15%) which has sulked away for 24 months in barrels and then six years in the bottle before they even release it. It’s still very dark in the middle, with quite a lot of fine particulate. The edge is fading, almost to a touch of orange, but only slightly. The nose is massive and powerful. Red cherries dominate. The mouth deliveries a huge sensation of different flavours. I first get some orange-like citrus. Then a huge umami sensation like drinking miso soup. This is followed by more dark fruits. Blackberries, maybe. And some cherries. The tannins are still present and strong but they are not excessive and reasonably elegant. Whilst not an expensive wine this is clearly one for the long-haul. I’d like to try this again in a few years, together with some of their more expensive blends.
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MigSU
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Re: DOC-bagging

Post by MigSU »

Good choice! I like their wines.
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JacobH
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Re: DOC-bagging

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Back to the Azores for a DOC Pico, the 2018 Frei Gigante white from, appropriately enough, the Ilha do Pico co-operative. It’s apparently a blend of Arinto do Açores, Verdelho and Terrantez do Pico which are vinified separately and then blended before bottling. I’m not sure if the Arinto is the same variety that is grown on the mainland and if the Terrantez is the same as is grown on Madeira. In any event, I really like this wine. It is light and fresh, with decent acidity and a touch of salinity that seems to be a feature of the wines from the Azores. They make some single-variety whites, too; some reds (although these mostly seem to be from international varieties like Syrah, Merlot etc.); and some fortified wines. I’m not terribly interested in international-style wines but would like to try the fortifieds at some point.

I think I have said this already but every wine I have had from the Azores has been excellent. I really under-estimated how good they would be. I also had a glass, yesterday, of a wine from the Canaries, the 2019 “Benje” by Envinate from Tenerife. It was really so disappointing and demonstrated to me that volcanic soils; a good climate; and traditional grape varieties do not automatically result in good wine.
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JacobH
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Re: DOC-bagging

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From DOC Távora Varosa, we open the Titan of Távora Varosa Daemon White 2018 by “Titan of Douro”. I don’t know this company, although apparently it is named after their dog—a Dogo Argentino—which is illegal to own in the UK! They are right down in the Távora valley (South of São João da Pesqueira) at the bottom of the Douro DOC region and, presumably, just over the border into Távora Varosa. Some of their Douro wines look quite interesting: there is one that is aged in amphorae which I haven’t seen in the Douro before.

This is a blend of Gouveia, Cerceal and Malvasia Fina. I can’t find out much about Gouveia which I don’t think I’ve come across before.

Anyway, the wine is a very attractive golden hay colour. Very little fruit on the nose but quite aromatic. In the mouth, it is powerfully acidic, with little fruit. I’m not sure how this was aged but I can’t detect any oak. Not really my sort of wine, unfortunately: too punchy and not rounded enough.
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MigSU
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Re: DOC-bagging

Post by MigSU »

JacobH wrote: 14:47 Tue 14 Sep 2021 From DOC Távora Varosa, we open the Titan of Távora Varosa Daemon White 2018 by “Titan of Douro”. I don’t know this company, although apparently it is named after their dog—a Dogo Argentino—which is illegal to own in the UK! They are right down in the Távora valley (South of São João da Pesqueira) at the bottom of the Douro DOC region and, presumably, just over the border into Távora Varosa. Some of their Douro wines look quite interesting: there is one that is aged in amphorae which I haven’t seen in the Douro before.

This is a blend of Gouveia, Cerceal and Malvasia Fina. I can’t find out much about Gouveia which I don’t think I’ve come across before.

Anyway, the wine is a very attractive golden hay colour. Very little fruit on the nose but quite aromatic. In the mouth, it is powerfully acidic, with little fruit. I’m not sure how this was aged but I can’t detect any oak. Not really my sort of wine, unfortunately: too punchy and not rounded enough.
It's probably Gouveio, which in the Douro is sometimes erroneously called verdelho. I happen to have quite a few hectares of Gouveio, it's a variety that I quite like, great acidity and ageing potential.
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JacobH
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Re: DOC-bagging

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Another wine from Lisboa, the 2019 Casa das Gaeiras Maria Gomes which is a DOC Óbidos. This is 100% Fernão Pires / Maria Gomes which the label tells me is “Portugal’s most classic white grape”! Despite the trolling, and the reasonably-modest price, I think this is pretty good. The wine has a very full, rounded mouthfeel. There is a sort-of buttery apple sensation followed by bracing acidity. The aftertaste is reasonably long with some violets. A bit too acidic for my tastes, but if you like the fuller-bodied whites this might be one to try.

Also, since last posting here, I drank what I think is my first unclassified Portuguese wine: a 2015 Buçaco tinto which is a mixture of wines from Dão and Bairrada made to be the house wine at the Bussaco Palace Hotel. I think it’s now made by Niepoort. It was a perfectly acceptable wine: bold and full-bodied but I felt it was a bit disappointing: not worth the €45 it costs.
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MigSU
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Re: DOC-bagging

Post by MigSU »

I think Fernão Pires is the most widely planted white grape variety in Portugal (in hectares).
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JacobH
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Re: DOC-bagging

Post by JacobH »

I can well believe that. But isn't calling it the "most classic" grape a bit of a stretch? Like calling negra mole the "most classic" Madeiran grape since it is the most planted one.
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MigSU
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Re: DOC-bagging

Post by MigSU »

That's a fair point.
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JacobH
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Re: DOC-bagging

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I have not bagged much since last posting.

I have become aware that there is at least one new DOC in Portugal: DOC Alentejo Vino de Talha being an Alentejo wine that has been aged in a clay pot—talha—rather than anything else. It probably existed in 2020 when I started this thread but I was oblivious to it since there doesn’t actually seem to be a readily-available list of the wine-regions in Portugal... Anyway, I have tried a few of them. I think the 2018 Bojador Talha White was the first to have DOC Talha label on it. They are all quite enjoyable, especially the whites which are fermented on their skins and move into orange territory. However, I have been completely spoiled by a couple of weeks in Georgia where the traditional “amber” wine is similarly aged in clay—qvevri—and is outstanding. I am just sad that it is not available very easily in the UK, except for silly money.

I have also just opened a DOC Encostas D’Aire a 2021 “Medieval de Ourém” Vinha da Malhada Rosé by Quinta do Montalto. This one is odd, even by Portuguese standards. Apparently the vineyard is planted in the manner of a monastry, with a high density of vines but pre-modern pruning techniques. The rosé seems to be made by taking 80% Fernão Pires, pressing and fermenting it and adding it to a barrel before topping it up with 20% Trincadeira must and leaving it to complete its fermentation. It rather reminds me of some of the Madeiran rosé table-wines: good and high acidity with decent body. It’s everything I would hope for in a rosé but then I only drink that type of wine about once a year!

I also tried, recently, some of the Azores’ fortified wine: a 10-year-old Verdelho by Ilha do Pico. It was fine and drinkable, but I’m afraid I don’t think I would seek it out (as opposed to say the Carcavelos from Villa Oeiras which, on re-tasting, is more than just a novelty: it’s very decent wine. Unfortunately, for this thread, I don’t think it is a new DOC since I think it comes within DOC Pico.

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mosesbotbol
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Re: DOC-bagging

Post by mosesbotbol »

JacobH wrote: 20:16 Wed 29 Jun 2022 I also tried, recently, some of the Azores’ fortified wine: a 10-year-old Verdelho by Ilha do Pico. It was fine and drinkable, but I’m afraid I don’t think I would seek it out (as opposed to say the Carcavelos from Villa Oeiras which, on re-tasting, is more than just a novelty: it’s very decent wine. Unfortunately, for this thread, I don’t think it is a new DOC since I think it comes within DOC Pico.

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Pico wines is available locally, generally at only real "neighborhood" liquor stores in heavily Portuguese enclaves. It's at a low price point. Next step up and it's port or madeira for most consumers.

I've seen wines jerepigo from Portugal and similarly low price point.

It's nothing special as you say humbly state. There are more people from the Azores in MA than there are in the Azores.
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MigSU
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Re: DOC-bagging

Post by MigSU »

You probably mean jeropiga/geropiga. It's actually grape must fortified with grape spirit. It's a typical drink for - and typically drunk with - chestnut season (autumn - so just after grape harvest season). As you say, it's nothing special, just an interesting cultural thing.
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JacobH
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Re: DOC-bagging

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mosesbotbol wrote: 20:12 Tue 05 Jul 2022Pico wines is available locally, generally at only real "neighborhood" liquor stores in heavily Portuguese enclaves. It's at a low price point. Next step up and it's port or madeira for most consumers.
I thought might be the case. Although this one is pretty pricy. It’s €47.68 in Portugual which would get you a decent Port, Madeira, or pretty much anything else!
MigSU wrote: 21:51 Tue 05 Jul 2022 You probably mean jeropiga/geropiga. It's actually grape must fortified with grape spirit. It's a typical drink for - and typically drunk with - chestnut season (autumn - so just after grape harvest season). As you say, it's nothing special, just an interesting cultural thing.
That sounds quite fun!
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winesecretary
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Re: DOC-bagging

Post by winesecretary »

You get fortified red and white jerepigo from South Africa which must be a related drink. Some of it is matured for as much as 6 months... [actually, I've had some more than acceptable old vintage ones]
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Re: DOC-bagging

Post by MigSU »

Huh, interesting, had no idea. Yeah, it must have originated from the Portuguese jeropiga.
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